phoneIcon765.293.4980
dwnArrow

Pigheaded Discipline or Flexibility?

February 6, 2019 | Leadership, Self Help, Time Management

Photo by Mark Cooke on Flickr As I have posted before, I am in the midst of re-reading Chet Holmes: The Ultimate Sales Machine. While the book talks about how to increase sales through better prospecting and scripting, it first addresses time management and how to plan out your day. A Life Long Student I have long been a student on how to best manage time. I don't believe tools such as google calendar, google tasks, or Microsoft Outlook are time management strategies. They are just tools. Since being in the workforce, I have used Franklin-Covey's Planner and David Allen's Getting Things…

Read More »


Does Being A Great Team Leader Mean The Door Should ALWAYS Be Open?

December 31, 2018 | Leadership, Time Management

Photo by egvvnd on Flickr I began reading a book called the "Ultimate Sales Machine" by Chet Holmes. I enjoyed reading the first chapter that discussed time management some time management techniques. One point the author made was to schedule every aspect of my day. This schedule included managing frequent pop-ins by other co-workers. He called them, "got a minute" meetings. You know, each time a subordinate, co-worker, or boss peeks their head in your cubicle or office door and says, "got a minute?". Instead, he encouraged his readers to block 30 minutes each day for "open office hours" where people could hold…

Read More »


‘Twas The Night Before Enlightenment

December 14, 2018 | Communication, Employee Recognition, Leadership, Teamwork, Trust

Photo by sea turtle on Flickr I wrote this a few of years ago, and I hope you enjoy reading it this holiday season! ''Twas the night before Christmas, all had left for the holiday break. But I was at the office stirring, for rarely a break did I take. How could I rest, with a business to run? If I am not here, nothing gets done. With profits at a record low, and turnover at an all-time high, Unless I improved in 2019, my business and dream would surely die. If only my employees were loyal and engaged in…

Read More »


Did We Respond or React?

October 16, 2018 | Communication, Leadership, Trust

Photo by aaron gilson on Flickr One of Merriam-Webster's definitions for the word "react" is "to act in opposition to a force or influence." One of Merriam-Webster's definitions for the word "respond" is "to say something in return." Given these definitions and some of my experiences, here is what I have learned: Along with the spoken message, reacting involves some type of behavior. It could be defensiveness, manipulation, passive-aggressiveness, or rage. Reacting comes from someone who is either angry or scared or both. Often, that feeling of anger or fear is triggered by the message being heard, and usually, this is…

Read More »


You’ve Been Promoted To Supervisor. Now What?

May 18, 2016 | Communication, Leadership, Trust

Photo by David Blackwell on Flickr Your boss quit. Management has promoted you to supervisor. Please check out my short video about what to do when you have been promoted from a non-leadership position to your first one as a leader. https://youtu.be/EGu1e84mNYw What would you say in your first conversation with your direct reports after you had been promoted?

Read More »


Managers Can Apply Nursing Principles To Leadership

May 12, 2016 | Communication, Leadership, Trust

Photo by OnCall team on Flickr Since entering into the healthcare market over a decade ago, more than one person/organization has told me the importance of hourly rounding on patients in the hospital setting. Hourly rounding can address trips to the restroom, pain assessment, and simple needs such as drinks and food. Studies have shown that it reduces patient falls which are very dangerous for patients and very expensive for hospitals. The same can be said too for rounding on employees. Rounding on employees at the very least on a quarterly basis gives employees an opportunity to communicate with their…

Read More »


Procrastination-Everybody’s Doing It (and here’s how not to)

April 28, 2016 | Leadership, Self Help, Time Management

Written by Steven J. Hanley, PhD and Rich Earnest In fact, we just did. This post has been sitting on our to-do list for months. We all put off our responsibilities for another day. Some reasons are more acceptable than others. An impromptu family gathering because Aunt Trudy is in town seems like a reasonable excuse; binge watching House of Cards all weekend, not so much. There are also many less obvious reasons we procrastinate. Feelings of inadequacy, low self-esteem, guilt, depression, anxiety, or even an unconscious need to punish or sabotage ourselves can all play a role. These psychological factors…

Read More »


Truth: Not Just a Question of Morals or Ethics

March 16, 2016 | Leadership, Trust

Written by Steven J. Hanley, PhD and Rich Earnest Photo by KlearNØDE on Flickr The main character in Edgar Allen Poe’s macabre short story “The Tell-Tale Heart” tried fruitlessly to keep a dark secret from the police: that he had murdered, dismembered, and hid a man’s body under the planks of his floor at home. While being interviewed by the police he initially feigns ignorance. Ultimately, the truth gets the better of him and he cracks with a near delusional confession. Will telling an occasional lie in your day to day professional or personal life make you go crazy? Probably not.…

Read More »


Employee Feedback: Sugar-Coated or Bad Medicine?

February 1, 2016 | Communication, Employee Recognition, Leadership

Photo by Ramchandran Maharajapuram on Flickr I have to admit the title of this article forced me to listen to "Bad Medicine" by Bon Jovi and the song is still in my head (People younger than 40, YouTube it. Yes. Bon Jovi used to wear spandex and had big long hair). I have seen at least 2 articles in the Wall Street Journal which state in one way or another we should lessen the amount of negative feedback we give employees. The links can be found below: The Trouble with Grading Employees Everything is Awesome! Why You Can't Tell Your…

Read More »


Keep it Simple with Your New Year Recommitments

January 10, 2016 | Leadership, Self Help

Photo by Brett Jordan on Flickr How many times have we heard the phrase, "Keep it Simple"? It's usually followed by another word, stupid, but I thought it better to be more polite in this post. Business leaders, coaches, parents, and teachers have all said this phrase. I think it can also apply to our New Year Recommitments we have made. With one week already passed in 2016, how are you doing? I want to spend more time with my wife and kids, exercise more, produce more content, make more sales contacts.....the list goes on. The phrase, "Keep it Simple", pertains to…

Read More »


Next Page »


archive

categories

Subscribe to Blog

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

upArrow
quoteMark

MYTH: Government agencies always award contracts based on price alone. Lowest price always wins.

FACT: While some contracts are awarded to the lowest bidder, government agencies also make awards based on the best value which includes trade-offs between the ability to perform the work, quality, past performance, and price.

© 2019 Earnest Consulting Group